Why I Love HubSpot more than a Fat Kid Loves Cake

A lot of you have been asking me why I’m so passionate (downright smitten) about HubSpot, the #2 fastest growing software company, #33 fastest growing company overall — and #1 best place to work in Boston for the second year in a row, according to the Boston Business Journal.

Allow me to enumerate:

1. The People

Not surprisingly, when asked what they love most about the company, HubSpotters say exactly that: other HubSpotters. Takeaway: you can buy iphone 4S’, iPads, even cheap content and AdWords, but not badass people.

2. The Culture

Geek heaven. No, seriously. The place reeks of brilliant, creatively-driven people, who love what they do. Again, all the money in the world cannot buy that.

Impromptu ping pong and foosball tourneys? Beer pong? Iron Chef competition and fully-stocked food and beer in the fridge everyday? Mad-Men inspired vacation policy? Happy hour with HubSpotTV, streamed live every Friday? Got that, too.

HubSpot games foosball ping pong culture matches Orange Boston Cambridge MIT

Game On yo

Photos from HubSpot’s Expanded WorkSpace slide show here

Anything’s possible when you’re surrounded by people intrinsically-driven to Get Sh*t done. That’s what software, ad hoc teams in startup land are about: Produce results and solutions, grounded in data and delivered by the most talented people in the world (among them an Olympic gold medalist, former stand-up comedian and some pretty narly chefs).

Open desk space, work stations to ensure CHI (customer happiness index) and foster collaboration. Rotating desks (like musical chairs) every once in a while, to keep things (and employees) fresh and on top of their game.

Constant challenge/opportunities to see and do what’s new and next.    

3. The Numbers are Like Shakira’s Hips: They Don’t Lie (nonchalantly swiped from the HubSpot Fact Sheet)

Even MC Hammer’s getting into it
LINK SOURCES

Questions? Thoughts? Concerns? Drop a comment in the comment section or contact me directly 

DogPound Debonairing with Cleveland.com and the Browns

CLEVELAND – Last night it really hit me: this city’s going places. 

Never mind that guys like Joe Pulizzi, the Godfather of the phrase “content marketing” and Paul Roetzer, founder of the original hybrid/inbound marketing agency — continue to redefine and champion the spirit of the community.

Joe Pulizzi content marketing world cleveland

Courtesy of Joe Pulizzi, Content Marketing Institute

Putting Believeland on the map as hometown underdogs, testament to a community that deeply values its roots and shows heart, hunger and humility.

Damn. That was a lot of alliteration.

As opposed to a sniveling, inflated superego who says Akron is his real home. Coming from someone who wasn’t born and bred here (CalifNYorker), even outliers like me know how tactless that is.

For shame, doc.

But back to Cleveland and 2011. Tonight’s tweetup at Cadillac Ranch with Cleveland.com and the Browns marked the beginning of fall, birthdays, and culmination of summer weddings, blogging/media conferences (our very own Content Marketing World) and Boston Inbound Marketing Summit, vacations — and refreshingly little buzz over the F-word.

Over today’s #F8 conference hailing the “new age” of social networking via timelines, open graph and a new class of applications. The constant squawking for power in the social realm’s starting to riff even the savviest of users.

PR 20/20 Todd Sheppard social media Cleveland tweetup chomps mascot

Courtesy of Alana Munro, Cleveland.com

Promising myself I’d resist the urge to be that guy, myself and another member from last month’s Cleveland.com Twitter20 devised a social experiment prior to the event: where the words Facebook and timeline were officially taboo.

It was actually easier than I thought it’d be. Maybe because the novelty of newest, biggest, fastest and better’s older than the Ed Sullivan Show.

But still not as annoying as all the whining and complacency surrounding what people should be used to by now: life goes on.

Tech will always be moving forward. So in the time that it takes to jump on the haterade bandwagon, maybe do us a favor, can it and do something. Take control of your social experience.

Facebook social network users social media

Mildy apparently the new “Mildly”

Who knows, Google+ could announce it bought everyone out tomorrow and that’ll be the end of it. 

At the heart of it, though, dogpound debonairs are not unusual: We just genuinely like people. Get a rush out of making new connections, meeting and commiserating over some pretty badass people, like Gini Dietrich and Chris Brogan.

Still stand on the shoulders of giants.

Because at the end of the day, all the tools, apps and open-graph sharing cannot replace the power of genuine, human experience. In-person. In real-time. Always looking upward and outward.

About working on your business, not in it as Gini says.

Other than scoring a free pair of tickets to the Browns/Titans October 2nd (props to all the winners, you get a star next to your name below) —

That’s something to really get pumped about.

Browns Tweetup Cleveland social media Cleveland.com Byron Fernandez

Courtesy of Cleveland.com

Chomps Cleveland Browns mascot tweetup Cadillac Ranch

Chomps riding the Bull

Dawgs in Attendance:

Alana Munro @dawgpndgirl

*Me @byron_fernandez

Jennifer Spiker @SportStoleMyMan

Jessica Donlon @jessicadonlon

Julie Provins @julieprovins

*Kasey Crabtree @kaseycrabtree

*Laurel Miltner @laurelmackenzie

Lukas Treu @ltreu

*Paul Roetzer @paulroetzer

Stephen Garvin @CleveNole

Todd Sheppard @taawd

Tracy DiMarino @tracydimarino

RELATED LINKS

Julien Smith >> Information is Not the Problem

Gini Dietrich >> Four Ways to Unplug and Focus

How to Lose Credibility in Less than 10 Seconds: Netiquette 101 

Contact Byron

What’s Happened to PR? No More Unicorns and Rainbows

This post will likely anger a few people, and for that I am prepared. After all, this is a community I am devoted to, regardless of whether or not I agree with the practices I’ve been seeing lately.

But rather than continue with a laundry list of grievances myself and presumably countless other prospective job candidates, partners and customers have experienced or observed in traditional PR and marketing, I’ll just keep it short and sweet:

What’s happened to PR?

To speak quite plainly, it sucks.

Whatever happened to the art of professional courtesy or follow-up? Of gracing a job candidate or prospective partner, client with the decency of a simple yes, or no?

But nothing? I don’t care if you’re Edelman or an obscure firm out in Alaska, a newfangled response (positive or negative) is still better than leaving people hanging.

That’s just impolite.

More importantly, from a branding perspective, why give people reason to question or speculate? As Dan Zarrella discussed in yesterday’s Guinness-World record setting webinar The Science of Social Media:

“Don’t let information voids spread around your brand” (especially in a time of crises, but I’d argue anytime) … “Find out what they want to know and give them that info.”

None of these sentiments should be new to practitioners, nor anyone with proper business acumen.

Allow me the presumption of speaking for purportedly naive, overly-zealous job seekers, students and workers my age:

We’d just appreciate the courtesy of a response, especially when we’ve taken the time to write a cover-letter, send resumes and consult with those in our network about matching our skills to your position.

Perhaps we weren’t the right fit (clearly, since you promised to get back and never did). Perhaps we wonder: if this is the way a company treats people who are not even inside its doors or on its payroll, how is it treating those that are?

Where is the accountability that everyone whines about nowadays? Perhaps Gen XY’s passion is impatient, entitled, overbearing, yada yada — but at least we still dare to show it.

It’s about heart, and we’ve got a lot of it.

Where’s yours? If you’re waiting for us to stop, to relent, you’ve only added insult to injury by underestimating our resolve. In business and in life, what you don’t say often resonates more than what you do. (Classic omission paradox).

We will continue to show initiative and the nerve to call out the injustice of impotent and cynical leadership, regardless of where it’s taking place (and especially when it’s among our own).

Until there is change, people will continue to suffer. That does not exclude those who work hard. It does not exclude those who have earned degrees, internships, have families, mortgages, student debt…list goes on.

I’m not saying there aren’t brilliant PR and marketing firms out there. In fact, many tech-savvy firms are integrating, acquiring and growing exponentially. These firms know how to wow and delight their people, from the inside out.

These firms are the ones willing to lead by example, and advise others who are still attempting to do new things with outdated and irrelevant strategies, techniques and approaches.

Here’s hoping PR folks will learn now — before it’s too late.

What really grinds your gears about the state of PR and business (or political) leadership today? Would love to hear your thoughts on this.

RELATED LINKS

Gini Dietrich, Spin Sucks >> PR Pros: Stop Treating Bloggers Like Second-Class Media

Paul Roetzer, PR 20/20 >> Death of the Traditional Marketing Agency

Amber Naslund, Brass Tack Thinking >> 5 Reminders for Social Media Job Candidates